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FDA Reaches Voluntary Agreement with Manufacturers to Phase Out Certain Short-Chain PFAS in Food Packaging

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that manufacturers of certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) used for grease proofing in paper and paperboard for food packaging (for example, as coatings on some fast food wrappers, to-go boxes, and pizza boxes) have voluntarily agreed to phase out sales of these substances for use as food contact substances in the United States, following new analyses of data raising questions about potential human health risks from chronic dietary exposure.

Starting in January 2021, three manufacturers will begin a three-year phase out of their sales of certain substances that contain 6:2 FTOH for use as food contact substances in the U.S. marketplace.  It may take up to 18 months after the phase-out period to exhaust existing stocks of paper and paperboard products containing these food contact substances from the market. A fourth manufacturer informed the

Proposition 65 – OEHHA Proposes Safe Harbor Concentrations and Blanket Protections for Exposures to Acrylamide and Other Listed Chemicals in Cooked or Heat Processed Foods

On August 4, 2020, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), the lead agency that implements Proposition 65 and has the authority to promulgate and amend regulations, released a proposed regulation providing that intake of listed chemicals formed by cooking or heat processing foods would not represent an exposure for the purposes of Proposition 65 if the concentrations are reduced to the lowest level currently feasible. The proposed regulation would also establish maximum concentration levels for acrylamide in specific foods that are deemed by OEHHA to be the lowest levels currently feasible. Concentrations of acrylamide at or below the level identified for the specified products would not require a warning. Public comments concerning this proposed action must be received by OEHHA by October 6, 2020.

Proposition 65 prohibits a person in the course of doing business from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a chemical that has been

UK Government Business and Planning Bill – Licensing update

June 29, 2020

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Pavement Licences

To help food and beverage operators to maximise their capacity whilst complying with social distancing guidelines, the Bill introduces a fast track procedure for pubs, bars, restaurants and others selling food or drink for consumption to obtain a “pavement licence” from the local authority.

A pavement licence will allow operators to put removable furniture on part of the highway adjacent to their premises for use, among other things, in connection with the sale, serving, or consumption of food and drink.

The application must be displayed by site notice and must go through a 7 day public consultation period from the day after the application was made. Local authorities will then have 7 days to make a decision following the end of the public consultation period. Failure to reject the application will amount to a deemed grant of the licence. The local authority can levy a fee of up

A Guide to Navigating COVID-19 Price-Gouging Litigation Against Manufacturers, Suppliers, and Retailers of Food and Consumer Goods in the U.S.

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to sharp spikes in demand for basic necessities, alcohol-based disinfecting products, and essential food staples. Consumers have been willing to pay a premium to stock up on these items from both brick-and-mortar and online marketplaces.  While there is no federal law establishing clear guidelines regarding price gouging, many states have laws that limit or prohibit sellers from charging excessive prices for certain consumer products, which are triggered by the declaration of an emergency by federal, state, and/or local officials. Plaintiffs’ lawyers and states’ attorneys general have begun bringing state and nationwide class actions for price gouging against suppliers, distributors, and retailers of essential products, and we expect this litigation to increase in coming months.

In this three part series, we provide the statutory landscape and analyze the newly filed litigation, outline some key litigation strategies, and advise on best practices for manufacturers and retailers to

A Checklist for the U.S. Food Retail Industry in Light of COVID-19 Re-openings

May 8, 2020

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On April 24, 2020, Alaska became the first state to allow restaurants to reopen to dine-in customers (subject to certain precautions) since the COVID-19 pandemic began.  On April 27, 2020, Georgia and Tennessee followed suit.  Several other states have announced similar plans to reopen restaurants to dine-in customers throughout May.

Each state has its own requirements for re-opening, and many include some combination of the following restrictions: 1) workers must wear masks; 2) restaurants can only allow outdoor dining; 3) establishments can only be filled to a certain capacity (typically 25% or 50%); 4) reservation-only dining; and 5) hand sanitizer must be available at each table or at the restaurant’s entrance.

In light of these re-openings, we suggest that companies in the food retail industry consider the following, if they have not done so already:

  • Determine whether it is financially feasible to reopen if required to comply with the

Proposed House Bill Could Save Cannabis Businesses Suffering During the COVID-19 Crisis

April 24, 2020

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The Emergency Cannabis Small Business Health and Safety Act (the “Act”), introduced by House Reps. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Ed Perlmutter (D-CO), could help an industry which employs at least 250,000 Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic. Despite being designated an “essential service,” cannabis businesses, and those businesses serving the cannabis industry, are largely shut out from receiving financial assistance under the recently passed CARES Act. The lack of equal access leaves an industry already suffering disproportionate financial burdens under normal conditions, especially vulnerable. The Act as proposed clears the way for cannabis businesses to apply for and receive access to federal programs such as the Paycheck Protection Program and the U.S. Small Business Administration Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program, which offer forgivable federal loans for business expenses, including, payroll, rent, debt obligations and utility payments. Given that cannabis remains federally illegal as a Schedule I drug, it remains to be

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